Luke 8:15 KJV

Teaching children patience (2)

Luke 8:15 KJV

Here are five more teaching tips: (1) Teach by experiment. Toddlers through “tweens” can appreciate the time it takes a plant to grow, so involve them in planting a seed and watching it grow. Explain how everything in life takes time to change and develop. Teach the meaning of Ecclesiastes 3:1 NKJV: “To everything there is a season, a time for every purpose under heaven.” (2) Make use of visuals. Younger children especially need visuals when waiting for an event to happen. If it’s 4:30 and dinner is at 5:00, use a timer. If it’s eighteen days until the family trip to Disney World, let them mark the days off on a calendar. Often their problem with waiting is not knowing when it will end. (3) Don’t interrupt and don’t tolerate interruptions. Toddlers to teens- kids interrupt! Adults, too. Interruptions are usually a rude and frustrating display of impatience. Unless it’s an emergency, be clear: Kids-and adults-are to wait their turn to speak. It’s more than good manners-it’s obeying God’s Word. “There is…a time to keep silence, and a time to speak” (vv. 1, 7 NKJV). (4) Make use of board games. Most board games require taking turns, which means waiting. Your kids will hardly realize they’re practicing patience! Chess and checkers are good for tweens. Scrabble educates teenagers and teaches them patience. (5) Reward their patience. When your toddler waits for his sippy cup to be filled while you feed the baby, thank him for waiting so well. If your teen saves her money to buy an iPod, compliment her wisdom and reinforce it by perhaps donating the last few dollars to her purchase.

Soul food: Jer 1-3; Luk 19:28-40; Ps 55:12-23; Prov 8:19-21

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Romans 8:25 NLT

Teaching children patience (1)

Romans 8:25 NLT

Waiting patiently is what life, God, and success demand. Even when we’ve done the right things, God requires us to wait for the results. “You have need of endurance, so that after you have done the will of God, you may receive the promise” (Hebrews10:36 NKJV). How do we help our children develop this vitally important life skill? Writer and mother Tammy Darling says: (1) Set clear boundaries. For instance, say, “You may have that when I’ve seen you wait patiently.” Don’t be moved by their demands! (2) Refocus their attention. Waiting in line at the store can be an occasion for impatience. So try a guessing game-like “I Spy”-with younger kids, or get older kids talking about family vacation plans. (3) Teach by example. Do you pass other motorists on the highway just to get one car-length ahead? Impulsively charge something rather than wait until you have the money to buy it? Whether they’re three or thirteen, your children learn by watching you. (4) Avoid constantly saying, “Hurry up!” Toddlers typically dawdle. They’ve no idea how long getting ready takes. So instead of always telling them to hurry, help them learn the process and pace of getting ready. “It’s time to put your toys away…time to get your shoes and socks on…time to put your jacket on.” Instead of frustrating them with commands to hustle, involve them in actions they understand and can handle. This teaches them how to manage time practically.

Soul food: Hos 11-14; Luk 19:11-27; Ps 55:1-11; Prov 8:17-18

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Judges 11:35 KJV

Staying power (3)

Judges 11:35 KJV

Staying power overcomes family opposition. When Jephthah’s family disowned him and threw him out of the house, he built an army that delivered Israel from the hands of their enemies. As a result, he ended up becoming the nation’s youngest judge. When faced with the challenge to ‘fold up or hold up,’ David Livingstone demonstrated staying power. His wife, Mary, gave him so much trouble, always complaining and criticizing, that she made his life’s work almost impossible. The tension between them became so great that Livingstone sent her home to England for a period of more than twelve years while he suffered, bled, and ultimately died in Africa for the cause of Christ. When Jesus went home to Nazareth to minister to the people He grew up around, some of them tried to throw Him off a cliff. And in spite of His teachings and miracles, His family thought He was mad. Did that hurt Him? Of course. But He didn’t let it stop Him. He said: ‘Anyone who wants to be my follower must love me far more than he does his own father, mother, wife, children, brothers, or sisters – yes, more than his own life – otherwise, he cannot be my disciple. And no one can be my disciple who does not carry his own cross and follow me…don’t begin until you [first] count the cost’ (Luke 14:26-28 TLB). When your family opposes you, love them and pray for them because God can change their hearts. And until He does, keep serving Him.

Soul food: Is 39-40; Phil 1

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